Blue Flowers That Will Beautify Any Garden

Introduction

All flowers are beautiful. However, there’s just something about blue flowers that give gardens that ‘wow factor’. Pink, yellow, and red flowers are some of the most common colored flowers out there. However, blue flowers are rather elusive so it can be tricky finding the right variety. What’s more, lighting can affect the flower of blue flowers. Most of the time in flower catalogs, you may think you’ve found your elusive species of flowers that bloom in vibrant and gorgeous shades of blue. However, when you actually get them, you realize that they’re shades of purple instead. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of the best blue flowers in this article. So, if you’re interested in blue flowers, keep reading to find out more!

1. African Lily

First on our list is the African Lily. African Lilies come in gorgeous clusters of white and blue and they bloom mostly during the summer. This species of flower thrives when it’s under direct sunlight and is grown in well-drained, moist, and fertile soil. African Lilies will look beautiful in just about any garden and they’re excellent accent and cut flowers as well.

2. Blue Star

Blue Stars get their name from the small star-shaped Amsonia flowers that cluster together, forming pretty and dainty bushels. These flowers bloom for weeks and come in varying shades of blue, so you’ll definitely be able to find a shade that you like. In 2011, the Arkansas blue star was named the Perennial Plant of the Year.

3. Blue False Indigo

Blue False Indigos are part of the pea family and these flowers are commonly used to make dye. Blue False Indigos grow in dense clusters on long stems. One interesting fact about these gorgeous flowers is that after germination, these flowers usually grow below ground for the first few years. These flowers start to mature after two blooming seasons and that’s when their characteristic blue clusters start to form.

With edible blue, and sometimes pink flowers that have a cucumber-like flavor, you can use these flowers in your garnish dips, salads, or even summer drinks. It grows up to 2’-3’ tall and is very versatile.

$2.49

This exquisite Native Blue Mist flower is a late-season butterfly magnet. It has a fabulous blue-violet color and can look rather magical; especially as each tiny blossom is an enchanting cushion.

$61.19

Why choose one type of blue flower when you can get a beauteous mix with this pack? From Bachelor Buttons and Blue Flax to Love In a Mist and Baby Blue Eyes, your garden is sure to look like a dream!

$1.99


4. Borage

Only of the more uncommon species of blue flowers on this list, borage flowers aren’t usually found in gardens. This is pretty ironic given that they’re part of the forget-me-not family. Borage flowers are self-sowing annual flowers so once you’ve added them to your garden, you don’t have to worry about doing any sowing and within a few years, your garden will be full of them. Borage flowers can be used in cooking and have a taste and scent that’s similar to that of cucumbers.

5. Blue Mist Shrub

If you want to give your garden a whimsical, dreamy, fairytale-esque vibe, then we definitely recommend getting Blue Mist Shrubs. These flowers are nectar-rich and often attract bees in the summer. They also come in varying shades of blue, from light pale blue to dark azure. Blue Mist Shrubs are relatively low maintenance, apart from trimming the shrubs in the spring, you don’t have to do anything else. Blue Mist Shrubs thrive under direct sunlight and require well-drained soil.

6. Cornflower, Bachelor Button Flowers

Cornflowers, also known as Bachelor Button Flowers, are a common species of wildflowers that can be spotted in cornfields, hence their name. Cornflowers are also annual self-sowing flowers which means that once they’ve been established in your garden, you won’t have to worry about sowing them for the next few years. Like most flowers that are included on this list, cornflowers require little maintenance so they’re a great addition to your garden if you don’t have a lot of time on your hands.

7. Gentians

There are over a hundred species of Gentians and while not all of them come in shades of blue, our list of blue flowers won’t be complete without them! Most species of Gentians are either woodland or alpine plants which means that they thrive better in cooler temperatures. The Spring Gentian is the smallest of all Gentian flowers however it’s also one of the most beautifully colored ones — they come in rich and deep shades of blue.

Read about the other side of gardening: the pollinators in this book. Find out more about honeybees, bumblebees and more as well as interesting details of flora and fauna that are sure to enrich your gardening experience.

$17.95

Packed with chelated iron for quicker plant growth and richer leave colors, this plant food is instantly soluble and encourages blooming. What’s more, it won’t clog your sprayers at all.

$10.79


8. Himalayan Blue Poppy

Out of the flowers listed in this article, Himalayan Blue Poppies are the hardest to grow and are a test of your gardening skills. Himalayan Blue Poppies are hard to grow mostly because they’re native to the mountains in the Southeast of Tibet where the climate is usually moist and shady. As such, recreating this particular climate in our gardens is hard. However, this doesn’t mean that’s impossible to grow Himalayan Blue Poppies at home. Some gardeners have found success so if you’re up for the challenge, you should definitely give it a shot! You can purchase seeds of Himalayan Blue Poppies online or from a nursery where their packets will usually contain detailed instructions on how to grow and care for them. Based on reviews we found online, sowing the seeds during the winter seems to yield the best results when growing Himalayan Blue Poppies.

9. Love in a Mist

Another must-add to your garden if you’re looking to achieve that whimsical, dreamy, and rustic vibe is Love in a Mist flower. This gorgeous flower comes over 15 varieties of varying shades of white, purple, pink, and of course blue. The blue variety of Love in a Mist that we like the best is called ‘Miss Jekyll Indigo’ which comes in a lovely royal blue. Love in a mist are annual flowers and they’re great for adding contrast and texture in flower beds.

10. Lungwort

Last but not least, we have Lungwort. These flowers are one of the first to bloom during the spring and thrive in shaded gardens. The petals on Lungowrt flowers are paper-thin and they grow in clusters. In the past, people used to think that the Lungwort plant had medicinal properties and could cure respiratory diseases, hence its name. Though this isn’t true, we still think that this beautiful flower is a wonderful addition to any garden.

Conclusion

With that, we’ve come to the end of our list of blue flowers. We hope that this article has provided you with some ideas on what species of flowers you should add to your garden if you’re looking to spruce it up. Even if you don’t have green-fingers, most of the flowers on this list are a great addition to your garden as they’re self-sowing and require little to no maintenance at all. So, what are you waiting for? It’s time to get gardening!

Recommended Products

No. ProductPriceBuy
1Borage Seeds

With edible blue, and sometimes pink flowers that have a cucumber-like flavor, you can use these flowers in your garnish dips and salads.
$2.49Shop
2Blue Mist Flower

This exquisite Native Blue Mist flower is a late-season butterfly magnet. It has a fabulous blue-violet color and can look rather magical.
$61.19Shop
3Blues Brothers Seed Mix

Why choose one type of blue flower when you can get a beauteous mix with this pack? From Bachelor Buttons and Blue Flax to Love In a Mist.
$1.99Shop
4Dancing with Bees

Read about the other side of gardening: the pollinators in this book. Find out more about honeybees as well as flora and fauna.
$17.95Shop
5Super Bloom Plant Food

Packed with chelated iron for quicker plant growth and richer colors, this plant food is instantly soluble and encourages blooming.
$10.79Shop

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