Everything You Need To Know About Goat Fencing

Introduction

Are you a farmer? Or maybe you’re interested in rearing goats. Whatever the case, you’re going to need to know how to build a fence in order to keep your goats safe and contained. In this article, we’re going to cover everything you need to know about goat fencing. Keep reading to find out more!

The Basics of Fencing for Goats

When keeping goats, one of the first things you’re going to need to prepare is a fenced paddock where your goats can roam about, yet still, be kept safe. In fact, investing in proper fencing is more important than splurging on expensive feed or hay. So, if you’re just thinking of saving on costs by getting cheap fencing materials, you might want to think twice! If you invest in good-quality, sturdy fencing from the beginning, you don’t have to spend a lot of money or time on maintaining it. On the other hand, if you choose to get cheap fencing material, you will probably end up spending more money on repair costs every few months. These costs add up to quite a hefty sum over time so you’re better off spending the extra money to get a good-quality fence!

What’s more, the wear and tear of the fence isn’t the only time you need to consider. Goats are energetic and highly curious animals by nature. They’ll try to jump over, poke their heads through, and rub themselves against the fence. So, you’re going to need one that’s sturdy enough to keep them from escaping. In addition, your goat fence is the only thing that’s keeping predators and wild animals from harming or worse, killing, your goats. With that in mind, you definitely don’t want to get a cheaper, lower-quality fence at the expense of your goat’s safety.

When planning for your goat fence, you also need to bear in mind that there are other materials you’ll need, which also means additional costs. These extra materials include fence staples, a fence stretch, fence posts, and bracing wire.

Made of steel and heavy duty, these fence posts won’t bend and are made to be hammered into hard soil. They are perfect for securing snow fences, chicken wire, plants, netting and tree supports.

$50.22

Durable and rustproof, the wire mesh netting on this fence is made of high-quality galvanized steel and can be used indoors as well as outdoors. The thick wire is 2mm thick and strong enough for livestock.

$325.71

If you opt for galvanized metal fences, getting a chain link fence paint is essential to ensure that it looks fresh. This one offers excellent coverage, chip resistance and color retention for total protection.

$38.27


What You Need To Know About Constructing Your Fence

First things first, you’re going to need sturdy braces on both sides of your gate. Also, when laying out your fence, you’re going to need to stretch it as tight as possible to prevent any sagging. There’ll be no point in you spending all that money on a good quality fence, only to have it saggy. Your goats will have an easy time jumping over and escaping a fence that sags or leans to the side. Another thing to note is to get an adequate number of fence posts. To save costs, some people may be tempted to buy few fence posts and place them further apart. However, this is another factor that might cause your fence to sag over time. So, don’t fix your fence posts further apart than what is recommended and ensure that you purchase enough of them. When anchoring the fence to the fence post, you also need to make sure that you use enough staples to make sure that the fence doesn’t come loose.

If you’re clueless about installing fences and require step-by-step instructions, there are many instructional videos that you can find online. Alternatively, the USDA also has a detailed guide on how to properly install fences.

Materials You’ll Need For Your Goat Fence

If you’re looking for good-quality wire fences, we recommended using a reputable one. Some may be on the costlier side, but they’re much more sturdy, durable, and less flexible. Getting good quality wire fences from the start will ensure that you don’t need to worry about repairs or replacements for the next few years to come.

In addition, another great thing to look out for in fences is that their openings are smaller than two inches apart. So, you don’t have to worry about your goats sticking their heads or horns through and getting stuck. The fence should also be about five feet high, which is high enough to prevent goats from attempting to jump over them.

You’re also going to want to opt for single-strand bracing wire. We highly recommend against using wires with two strands. This is because goats can stick their heads through the strands and there have been cases reported of serious injury and even death. So, take our advice and keep your goats safe from harm by using single-strand bracing wire.

Featuring a snap-on nipple with a vacuum air vent, this nursing bottle is made of strong and durable polyethylene. It works to make calf-lamb and goat feeding more sanitary and entirely fuss-free.

$5.68

A quintessential addition to any goat’s diet, sunflower seeds (especially organic ones!) are a go to. Consider these for fresh and crunchy seed kernels that are delicious when eaten raw or roasted.

$4.02


Electric Fencing: Yes or No?

In general, most farmers have not found much success in using electric fencing to contain their goats. There are many stories of where one particular goat will forcefully ram its way through the electrical fence, especially if there’s browse or greenery on the opposite side of the fence. Following this, other goats will also follow suit which leads to the entangling of fence posts and wires. Not only is this a headache to fix, but, if your goats end up being entangled or trapped in the electric fence, this can lead to injuries or fatalities.

Split Rail Fence: Yes or No?

Goats are highly inquisitive, mischievous, but also smart. If they want to reach vegetation on the other side of the fence, they’re going to go whatever it takes to reach it. So, finding a way to squeeze themselves through the openings of split rail fences won’t be much of a challenge for them. With that in mind, we’ll leave it up to you to decide whether split rail fences are a suitable choice.

Conclusion

With that, we’ve come to the end of our article about everything you need to know about goat fencing. At the end of the day, the safety and well-being of your goats should be at the top of your priorities. So, all the decisions you make about constructing your goat fence should take that into consideration. Don’t skimp out on the quality of your fence materials for the sake of saving money. Not only will this cost you more in future maintenance and replacements costs, but you’ll also be compromising on the safety of your goats!

Recommended Products

No. ProductPriceBuy
1Rebar Fence Post

Made of steel and heavy duty, these fence posts won’t bend and are made to be hammered into hard soil. They are perfect for securement.
$50.22Shop
2Wire Stock Fencing with Mesh Opening

Durable and rustproof, the wire mesh netting on this fence is made of high-quality galvanized steel and can be used indoors and out.
$325.71Shop
3Chain Link Fence Paint

If you opt for galvanized metal fences, getting an excellent chain link fence paint is essential to ensure that it looks fresh.
$38.27Shop
4Nursing Bottle

Featuring a snap-on nipple with a vacuum air vent, it is made of strong and durable polyethylene to make goat feeding more sanitary.
$5.68Shop
5Origins Organic Sunflower Seeds

A quintessential addition to any goat’s diet, sunflower seeds (especially organic ones!) are a go to. Consider these for their freshness.
$4.02Shop

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